The McKintree Boys

By Ashley Bennett

1
Posted May 17, 2012 in Music
MEMBERS: 

Mark Ashley (upright and downright bass, vox); David Dickey (fiddle, mandolin, vox); Scott Ellis (drums, bodhran, percussion.); Adam McIntyre (acoustic guitar, electric guitar, lead vox).

CITIES OF ORIGIN:

Riverside, Redlands.

UPCOMING RELEASE: 

Self-released EP (Summer 2012).

KINDRED SPIRITS:

“Groups like Flogging Molly and the Young Dubliners influence us musically, but we are also inspired by our families and our kids, our social work and our faith. A couple of us are history geeks, too, so singing about battles, famines and oppression drawn from the journey of Ireland is pretty cool for us,” says Adam McIntyre.

WEBSITES:

www.themckintreeboys.com; www.facebook.com/themckintreeboys; Twitter:@McKintreeBoys.

Sure, Irish music is rambunctiously fun but you don’t have to wait for Saint Patrick’s Day to celebrate the atmosphere that Irish music can create. This genre of music has a constant energy that always promotes enjoyment as you sit back, grab a pint and enjoy the show with friends. With The McKintree Boys you’ll find plenty of incentive to go out for some Irish inspirations.

The McKintree Boys’ music and influence comes from more than a mere inspiring artist; Irish history is intertwined with the band’s birth. Adam McIntyre especially holds onto a bit of family history in conjunction with the band’s musical inspirations. “My great (something or other) grandfather Robert McIntyre came to America from Northern Ireland in the mid 1800’s on a coffin ship . . . as thousands did to try and escape the Potato Famine (which I sing about in one of our originals, ‘Old Pat Henry.’)  I’ve always enjoyed my research into his story and journey here from Ireland (as well as his father’s journey from Scotland) so it seemed a natural fit to try something like this,” says McIntyre.

“We play a lot of traditional tunes but we like to play them loud, raucous and electrified. I think that when people come to a pub, especially to see some music, they want to stomp their feet and raise their glasses. Our music provides that kind of an atmosphere. That’s why we do the shows in the turn-of-the-century garb,” says McIntyre. Nothing is more legit than a group of Irishmen who look the part of their ancestors and play songs about the past.

You can find The McKintree Boys at Killarney’s in Riverside this week as an initiative to bring a permanent Irish presence to the IE because ironically, Killarney’s doesn’t have a whole lot of Celtic tunes playing under it’s roof. “It’s my hope that we can book other Celtic themed bands in the future and make Sunday ‘Celtic night,’” says McIntyre. “I’m really looking forward to it as we will be playing in a manner that is similar to how they have done it in Dublin for centuries. Just some guys playing their hearts out around a table.”

The McKintree Boys at Killarney’s Restaurant & Irish Pub, 3639 Riverside Plaza Dr., Riverside, (951) 682-2933; www.killarneys.com/riverside. Sun, May 20. 7pm. Free.


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